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Posted: Sun Oct 08, 2006 5:46 am
by Spacemonkey
hmmm, my node map only had 19 points, i'll fix it up tonite

Posted: Sun Oct 08, 2006 2:43 pm
by Lazureus
I removed my nodes that were passing through narrow passages. It seems that even though your lines don't technically pass through land, they can still fail if the space the line passes through is narrow. I also moved other points so that the lines went directly between landmasses instead of going too close to a coastline. It seemed to work then.

Posted: Sun Oct 08, 2006 2:47 pm
by shinygerbil
I'm guessing narrow spaces wouldn't be able to fit a fleet of 6 ships through them anyway, so it makes sense that the line joining the two nodes should have a "thickness" to represent that, I suppose :)

Posted: Wed Oct 11, 2006 4:59 pm
by denzil
damn shiny, that would make so much sense! will take that into consideration when we do our ai_markers and travel_nodes for Ghosthack!

now to work out what the difference between ai_markers and travel_nodes is exactly...

Posted: Wed Oct 11, 2006 7:54 pm
by Icepick
ai_markers.bmp contains 2 sets of information

Green Points
The green points on the map represent placement guidelines for the AI. An AI player will always try and place its ships close to a green point inside its own territory. They are positioned with the general idea of stopping the AI from placing a unit in a tactically unsound location (eg, too far from the action, too close to the coastline.)

Red Points
The red points act as guidelines for tactical positions that fleets should use for attacking an enemy territory. For example, a fleet of subs would move close to one of the red points in order to nuke enemy cities. Red points should be fairly close to a territory's coastline, within range of a resonable number of cities.

There are a few rules that need to be followed when placing these points:
The point must be a valid location for a fleet to move too. This means not too close to the coastline, or on land.
Each territory must have AT LEAST one green point and two red points. Ideally, each territory should have at least 4 or 5 of each.
There should be no points outside of a valid territory, or anywhere on land.

Hope this helps.

Posted: Wed Oct 11, 2006 8:55 pm
by Gein
Icepick wrote:ai_markers.bmp contains 2 sets of information

Green Points
The green points on the map represent placement guidelines for the AI. An AI player will always try and place its ships close to a green point inside its own territory. They are positioned with the general idea of stopping the AI from placing a unit in a tactically unsound location (eg, too far from the action, too close to the coastline.)

Red Points
The red points act as guidelines for tactical positions that fleets should use for attacking an enemy territory. For example, a fleet of subs would move close to one of the red points in order to nuke enemy cities. Red points should be fairly close to a territory's coastline, within range of a resonable number of cities.

There are a few rules that need to be followed when placing these points:
The point must be a valid location for a fleet to move too. This means not too close to the coastline, or on land.
Each territory must have AT LEAST one green point and two red points. Ideally, each territory should have at least 4 or 5 of each.
There should be no points outside of a valid territory, or anywhere on land.

Hope this helps.


I love you.

Posted: Wed Oct 11, 2006 10:21 pm
by denzil
Cheers Icepick, much appreciated!

Is there a limit on either of the types of marker?

Also, my map is quite packed so the territories are small so as not to overlap one another, making it hard to place markers where fleets fit inside the territories :/