Suggestions from a Criminologist

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CJH
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Re: Suggestions from a Criminologist

Postby CJH » Wed May 28, 2014 7:41 pm

In some degree yes. Shouldnt be a piece of cake to get free in my opinion. Why should always the focus be on more or less the person who made the crimes? What about relatives to the victim? What is their say in it? They are punished for life for losing a close person while the perpetrator is free after around 8 years.

I get also what you probably meen. Should society rehabilitate these people or not? I take for granted thats what you were thinking about?. Norway and Sweden for example have very liberal prisons with many privileges for inmates in general, many programs and leisure activities etc. This is nothing prisoners here have worked hard for to get, or proved they deserve a second chance. Statistics show that the "relaps rate" (bare with my english) doesnt improve with this open (no walls) kind prisons either. Prisoners that have served their time fall back in crime again, we have allot of programs after they get free and society in general (in my view) dont have the same hatred against them as in for exemple the US.I could be wrong but thats just a feeling i have. There are also plenty of jobs they could get. Altogether it seems more liberal and humane in Scandinavian societies, media and "the word on the street" towards prisoners. Im not sure is this really improving the statistics of the reoffending rate? Is this the way to go?
5hifty
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Re: Suggestions from a Criminologist

Postby 5hifty » Wed May 28, 2014 8:17 pm

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2013/feb/25/norwegian-prison-inmates-treated-like-people

The Guardian wrote:On Bastoy prison island in Norway, the prisoners, some of whom are murderers and rapists, live in conditions that critics brand 'cushy' and 'luxurious'. Yet it has by far the lowest reoffending rate in Europe.

The teacher explained that all prisons in Norway worked on the same principle, which he believed was the reason the country had, at less than 30%, the lowest reoffending figures in Europe and less than half the rate in the UK.


Wiki Reguarding US wrote:The recidivism rate for prisoners released from prison within one year is 44.1%; this number rises to 67.5% within three years of being released from prison.


CJH wrote:Im not sure is this really improving the statistics of the reoffending rate? Is this the way to go?


Seems it is.
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xander
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Re: Suggestions from a Criminologist

Postby xander » Wed May 28, 2014 9:13 pm

CJH wrote:--==<snip>==--

As I said before, I was confused by your comment. You clarified by stating that you believe that prisons are meant to provide retribution. I now understand where you are coming from and am not confused about your comment. While I don't agree with your point of view, I have no interest in derailing this thread to debate it. There is no need to argue the point.

xander
LennyLeak
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Re: Suggestions from a Criminologist

Postby LennyLeak » Thu May 29, 2014 12:40 am

xander wrote:That doesn't mean that a life sentence is 15 years (or 10 years). That means that the maximum sentence is 15 years, and a life sentence is not an option. I'm still confused.

xander
I think the misunderstanding stems from the fact that the term 'life sentence' is not used literally in scandinavian law. In Denmark a 'livstidsdom' (litteral translation: lifetime sentence) is typically 15 years. While 15 will rarely be the rest of the convicts life, it is still termed a 'life sentence'.

CJH wrote:Norway and Sweden for example have very liberal prisons with many privileges for inmates in general, many programs and leisure activities etc. This is nothing prisoners here have worked hard for to get, or proved they deserve a second chance. Statistics show that the "relaps rate" (bare with my english) doesnt improve with this open (no walls) kind prisons either. Prisoners that have served their time fall back in crime again, we have allot of programs after they get free and society in general (in my view) dont have the same hatred against them as in for exemple the US.I could be wrong but thats just a feeling i have. There are also plenty of jobs they could get. Altogether it seems more liberal and humane in Scandinavian societies, media and "the word on the street" towards prisoners. Im not sure is this really improving the statistics of the reoffending rate? Is this the way to go?
The thing is recidivism is improved by resocialization, not just giving inmates more freedom and TVs. In Denmark the inmates have (IMO) fair facilities much unlike american cells (as seen on TV), but we have very little resocialization - like jobtraining and educational efforts - so our reoffending rate is not all that low. Personally I think this is a mistake since I am a consequentialist, but that is besides the point.
GalakFyarr
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Re: Suggestions from a Criminologist

Postby GalakFyarr » Thu May 29, 2014 10:49 am

SCHEDULING
- It would be great if we could alter schedules based on security risk. For instance, setting separate schedules by risk classification (i.e. Maximum, medium and minimum)


Agree. I'd love to be able to set separate regimes for each security level, this way we wouldn't need to duplicate a lot of rooms if we wish to keep security levels separate.
SergeantSwede
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Re: Suggestions from a Criminologist

Postby SergeantSwede » Thu May 29, 2014 12:59 pm

CJH wrote:In Sweden you get like max 10 years for murder = Life sentence. Its ridiculous


A life sentence in Sweden is actually for life. After about 10 years you can REQUEST having your sentence fixed. If it is accepted, they may set a much later date for release on parole.
I think it's pretty uncommon to be released after having served just 10 years of a life sentence. I think most of them are released sooner or later though.
CJH
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Re: Suggestions from a Criminologist

Postby CJH » Thu May 29, 2014 2:52 pm

Thats just not true at all.
SergeantSwede
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Re: Suggestions from a Criminologist

Postby SergeantSwede » Thu May 29, 2014 5:20 pm

CJH wrote:Thats just not true at all.


Yes it is. A life sentence in Sweden means that you serve until you die or until your request about a fixed sentence is accepted. You have the right to request a fixed sentence, but it doesn't mean they have to give in to your request. If they do decide to set a fixed sentence, it can not be shorter than 18 years. (which normally is the longest fixed sentence for crimes in Sweden at the moment) That being said, most (if not all) of them are released at some point.

Read up on it on kriminalvårdens web page if you wish, it's all there.

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