Article with prison facts. Interesting read.

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phees
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Article with prison facts. Interesting read.

Postby phees » Tue Oct 09, 2012 8:19 am

Found this article about prison facts:
http://cyclrmom.hubpages.com/hub/Prison-Facts

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Postby koshensky » Tue Oct 09, 2012 11:48 am

That's quite a nice little article. I look forward to my guards finding my prisoners trading in origami swans ^_^
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Postby ronanc » Tue Oct 09, 2012 12:15 pm

Here's a small piece I found on reddit yesterday about the South Korean jail experience for a foreigner:

bukkoctopus 4 points 12 hours ago
What's life in Korean jail like?

cogit4se 44 points 11 hours ago
Food is great. A lot of the prisons have farms/large gardens that feed in to it. It's simple, largely vegetarian. They give you brown rice because white is too much of a luxury but brown is quite healthy so I didn't mind. The people were really nice; guards and inmates alike. Most were just really curious what a big white American guy was doing there. Even when we'd be walking back to our cells from exercise in the yard, people that didn't know me would say, "Hello! USA!" After I lost my fight against extradition, the head guard for my wing pulled me out of my cell and in to his office. He gave me a cup of coffee. Then he explained that he thought I was a good person and he really hoped I wasn't punished too severely when I got back to the US. Finally he invited me to come have dinner with his family if I was ever in Korea again. Pretty much the exact opposite of what you might expect from a locked-up abroad horror story. I learned later that I can't go back there ever. They have banned me for life. I lived so long in a place I thought was home, then I ran to this new place and for the first time in my life felt I was with people who understand me. It was like never being home and then discovering that "home" is a place and a reality. Now I'm forbidden to go there again. I don't know how to deal with this. I feel like I've been ejected from the planet Earth.

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Postby Nicotin » Tue Oct 09, 2012 1:48 pm

Well, this was unexpected.

I thought different about korean jails.
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Postby ronanc » Tue Oct 09, 2012 1:49 pm

Well, this was unexpected.


My thoughts exactly.
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Miami MegaJail a documentary

Postby decrocks » Tue Oct 09, 2012 2:32 pm

wow there both great reads

have you seen this,

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TZVqbAUMM9A

its Louis Theroux - Miami MegaJail a documentary by the BBC
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Postby largestherb » Tue Oct 09, 2012 3:24 pm

[hm]

the american 'justice system' is pretty.. weird. the free *cough*slave*cough* labour they get from prisoners is pretty disgusting, too. looking forward to see how workshops turn out ;)
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Postby ronanc » Thu Oct 11, 2012 2:58 am

Another interesting read on prison life:

Basic Survival Techniques for Incarceration
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Postby Prison Officer UK » Fri Oct 12, 2012 10:40 pm

To make a game like a real UK Prison would be impossible...if not only due to every gaol being different!
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Postby crummett » Sat Oct 13, 2012 12:44 am

Prison Officer UK wrote:To make a game like a real UK Prison would be impossible...if not only due to every gaol being different!


You'd need a lot of in game money too, for all the TVs, gyms, luxuries, guards to wipe their arses etc too
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Postby ronanc » Sat Oct 27, 2012 4:14 pm

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Re: Miami MegaJail a documentary

Postby koshensky » Sun Oct 28, 2012 1:32 am

decrocks wrote:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TZVqbAUMM9A

its Louis Theroux - Miami MegaJail a documentary by the BBC


Thing that struck me most about this was that the youth offenders actually admitted to what they did, whereas the adults got screwed by their lawyers ;)

Pretty good documentary from Mr. Theroux. He's done a couple of prison documentaries over the years. The one that sticks in my mind was when he went and interviewed a guy who was in solitary lockdown for 11 consecutive life sentences, which ended up totalling *googles* 521 years in prison. (Life Behind Bars, was the name of the documentary, for what it's worth).

Somewhat ties in to Ronanc's link to the article by a lawyer discussing what life without parole would mean.

In terms of adding something to the mix, I found the history of Alcatraz to be quite an interesting read: http://www.alcatrazhistory.com/
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Postby smccuan » Sun Oct 28, 2012 4:35 am

I've been to jail once for driving on a suspended license (I was an idiot and didn't pay two speeding tickets, that I also idiotically received on the same night -- and even more idiotically, received 10 minutes apart. Then a few months later, decided to drive home during a blizzard and ended up in a ditch where a cop came to check on me.) Needless to say, that has all been resolved, and I have not received any tickets since then, nor have I had any "negative" contact with police since then. That was my first and only arrest.

My limited experience in jail was very civil. I cooperated with the arresting officer (after a very brief failed stalling attempt out of fear.) As I had no intention of fighting something I was clearly guilty of, I ended up, although I know advisable to do, just being completely honest with the officer -- she returned that respect to me. (Minus being handcuffed in the back of a police car, while the cop is having fun getting away with power-sliding corners purely for fun during a blizzard. Although it hurt my wrists a little, it was still kind of fun.) I should also point out that the arresting officer was incredibly professional (minus the power-sliding), and went out of her way to make my experience as short and comfortable as possible. I was arrested around midnight on Thanksgiving Day-- she not only allowed me to use her cell phone while en route to the jail to call my parents, she also directly phoned a judge that she was friends with to get the whole bail thing in order *prior* to me even arriving at the jail.

Once we arrived at the jail, I was immediately un-handcuffed, even though others arriving after me didn't receive that "privilege." I was treated very courteously by the jail officers, who if I remember correctly never even placed their hands on me in any way, other than to "roll" my finger on the scanner for electronic fingerprinting. All of the other offenders were being "escorted" by the officers, while I was being "asked" to walk of my own accord to wherever they wanted me.

The jail officers were aware that my parents were on their way to bail me out, and I was also given another call at the jail to contact them again. The jail officers allowed me to remain outside of a holding cell, without any restraints, or changing of clothes, for the remainder of the first two hours. After that, they were worried that their supervisor might get uncomfortable with me being outside of a cell, so, I was placed in the general holding cell for about 20min before my parents showed up.

The people in the holding cell were there for public intoxication, minor drug possession, and another guy with a suspended license. Everyone in the holding cell was very courteous to each other, and the holding cell was viewed directly by three jail staff members on the opposite side of the cell door. Interestingly, one of the guys in the holding cell was convinced that I somehow smuggled Ecstasy in -- and I spent most of my time explaining that I hadn't smuggled in anything even though I still had my clothes on. It was a peaceful conversation -- he was just really high...lol.

Now that I have spent all of this time writing this out, I realize that it has almost nothing to do with this thread beyond possibly "sharing the experience." Oh well, now that I typed it out, definitely going to post it.


EDIT: Now that I've pretty much spelled this all out -- I may as well continue to say that the prosecutor ended up dropping the "Driving on a Suspended License" charge, which carries a $500 for two years fine, along with further license suspension, down to "Driving Without a Valid Operating License" (which I've been led to believe is legally equivalent to not having your valid license in your physical possession while driving -- it didn't carry the extra fines or extra suspensions.)
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Postby RMJ1984 » Mon Oct 29, 2012 3:23 am

It definitely feels like something the game needs, like in the Theme park and Theme Hospital games, there was always this chain if you will, either it be patients or customers, doesnt matter, there is always a short of chain of x things a person has to go through, then some are optional and based on the game.

It would be nice having this, the prisoners gets checked by the doctor and stuff like that, strip searched before getting in. making sure they are healthy, taking prisoners information. There could also be a storage room for prisoner stuff, i believe they have to give all their personal stuff for storage and they get it when they are released from prison.
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Postby ronanc » Mon Nov 05, 2012 1:39 pm

Another slice of prison life:

Curbing tuberculosis in South Africa’s prisons a priority for US prison architect Paul Silver -

http://www.bdlive.co.za/life/health/201 ... a-priority

I like this bit: "The city commissioned me to design cells for the inmates with the multidrug-resistant forms of TB" — Silver designed 120 cells with negative air pressure and ultraviolet light that stopped the spread of the disease."

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