Chinese Boxes & Japanese Nesting Dolls

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presserffg
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Chinese Boxes & Japanese Nesting Dolls

Postby presserffg » Sun Oct 21, 2018 8:44 am

Though the Russian Matryoshka doll was designed and created at the Abramtsevo colony in 1890, the nesting doll concept was popular in China and Japan long before Malyutin and Zvyozdochkin were inspired to put a new spin on it at the Abramtsevo estate. Chinese nesting dolls have been around since the eighteenth century, but nesting boxes were made in China as early as 1000AD. The nesting doll concept soon afterward spread into Japan in the form of the Fukuruma, a doll honoring Fukurokuju, the god of happiness in Japanese mythology.A Matryoshka nesting doll is a set of typically seven wooden dolls of decreasing sizes that all fit inside of each other, one by one. Each stacking doll splits in half at the mid section and opens to reveal another smaller doll nested within. The traditional Matryoshka doll is usually round in shape and decoratively painted to resemble a pretty young faced peasant woman dressed or bundled up in an extravagant sarafan costume, a loose fitting traditional Russian garment. The head of the stacking doll is usually also covered, perhaps to protect her from the cold weather characteristic of Russia's notoriously harsh, long winters.In 1890, the first Matryoshka doll was designed and painted by Sergey Malyutin and carved from wood by Vasily Zvyozdochkin. Malyutin and Zvyozdochkin were both Russian folk artists living under the patronage of the wealthy industrialist Savva Mamontov on the renowned Abramtsevo estate. Located north of Moscow, the Abramtsevo colony has continued to be a famous center for Slavic culture and folk art since the nineteenth century.
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Re: Chinese Boxes & Japanese Nesting Dolls

Postby graduateduser » Sun Oct 21, 2018 11:55 am

presserffg wrote:Though the Russian Matryoshka doll was designed and created at the Abramtsevo colony in 1890, the nesting doll concept was popular in China and Japan long before Malyutin and Zvyozdochkin were inspired to put a new spin on it at the Abramtsevo estate. Chinese nesting dolls have been around since the eighteenth century, but nesting boxes were made in China as early as 1000AD. The nesting doll concept soon afterward spread into Japan in the form of the Fukuruma, a doll honoring Fukurokuju, the god of happiness in Japanese mythology.A Matryoshka nesting doll is a set of typically seven wooden dolls of decreasing sizes that all fit inside of each other, one by one. Each stacking doll splits in half at the mid section and opens to reveal another smaller doll nested within. The traditional Matryoshka doll is usually round in shape and decoratively painted to resemble a pretty young faced peasant woman dressed or bundled up in an extravagant sarafan costume, a loose fitting traditional Russian garment. The head of the stacking doll is usually also covered, perhaps to protect her from the cold weather characteristic of Russia's notoriously harsh, long winters.In 1890, the first Matryoshka doll was designed and painted by Sergey Malyutin and carved from wood by Vasily Zvyozdochkin. Malyutin and Zvyozdochkin were both Russian folk artists living under the patronage of the wealthy industrialist Savva Mamontov on the renowned Abramtsevo estate. Located north of Moscow, the Abramtsevo colony has continued to be a famous center for Slavic culture and folk art since the nineteenth century.
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Interesting facts about matryoshka dolls:
Matryoshka appeared at the end of the 19th century in Moscow at the “Child care” factory. The name "matryoshka" is a derivative from the Russian name of Matryon. In the largest matryoshka 100 figures. Now she is in the Historical Museum in Moscow. The smallest nested doll was made by master Anatoly Konenko. It consists of four figures, the smallest of which is 1 millimeter. Each billet for nesting dolls goes through more than ten stages of processing.

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