Question about submitting.

The place to hang out and talk about totally anything general.
Spectre
level1
level1
Posts: 14
Joined: Sat Feb 18, 2006 5:57 pm

Question about submitting.

Postby Spectre » Fri Nov 28, 2008 7:33 am

Hey, Im James and I have a thousand and one great ideas for games and I was wondering who I speak to about submitting them. Ive asked at a few other companies and alot have said that they dont take outside ideas, if they answer at all. So no worries if you have the same policy.

Ill check back with the board, look forward to hearin from ya.

-Spectre
User avatar
KingAl
level5
level5
Posts: 4138
Joined: Sun Sep 10, 2006 7:42 am

Postby KingAl » Fri Nov 28, 2008 8:24 am

Ideas are a penny a pound; I can guarantee you will not find a company looking for people to submit ideas to them, nor will you find someone willing to collaborate with you purely on the basis of your ideas -- something at least half of the random people posting on the Uplink boards proposing to make 'Uplink 2' don't realise. If you want to try making your own games, then I'd look into learning to program.
Last edited by KingAl on Fri Nov 28, 2008 8:27 am, edited 1 time in total.
Gentlemen, you can't fight in here: this is the War Room!
Ultimate Uplink Guide
Latest Patch
User avatar
Pox
level5
level5
Posts: 1786
Joined: Sat Mar 03, 2007 11:23 am
Location: Melbourne

Postby Pox » Fri Nov 28, 2008 8:26 am

Ideas themselves are cheap - turning an idea into a design is what takes work. If you approach a game studio with an idea, such as "Make a game about shooting fairies", you're not going to be listened to. If you draw up a complete design spec with concept art, details of game mechanics, technical features, lists of game items, story outline, etc, then you may have better luck - but I still doubt any established studios will take an external idea. They generally have internal creative leads who know the ins and outs of both gameplay and programming/design, and typically they will develop a small number of ideas into prototypes, so unless you give them something brilliant and give up the rights, they won't pay any attention.

If you want to be noticed, learn some programming and create a basic prototype yourself - if you can get some attention online, you may be able to attract the attention of either various people who want to help out, or even a games company (see Narbacular Drop/Portal)... though chances are slim.
User avatar
KingAl
level5
level5
Posts: 4138
Joined: Sun Sep 10, 2006 7:42 am

Postby KingAl » Fri Nov 28, 2008 9:06 am

Which is not to discourage you, or anything; it's great that you want to make games. But you know what they say about free lunches? It applies.
Gentlemen, you can't fight in here: this is the War Room!

Ultimate Uplink Guide

Latest Patch
User avatar
NeoThermic
Introversion Staff
Introversion Staff
Posts: 6254
Joined: Sat Mar 02, 2002 10:55 am
Location: ::1
Contact:

Postby NeoThermic » Fri Nov 28, 2008 9:37 am

As has been noted, an idea by itself isn't any good unless you've got something to back it up with. The problem with presenting an idea to a games studio is a huge legal one. I know a lot of studios will just bin anything that starts to look like a game idea and the reason is straight forward:

Assume for a moment that you've come up with a new killer game concept. By killer I mean it's not in any game, and everyone on the world would want to try it. You jump on down to GamesCompanyX, who look at your idea, but reject you. A few months later GamesCompanyX releases a game with this killer concept in it. So begins a legal battle.

The problem gets even more contrived because most people do the logical thing, they try pitch their idea to the studios that do games of similar ilk. The bigger problem with that is said studios might already be running an idea very close to yours. If the above happened, in the court all the studio has to do is go "Here's our documentation dating back to {YEARS BEFORE PROSECUTION CLAIM} detailing our prototype and concept of said killer idea" and they've basically won the case.

The suggestion to get around this is really really simple. Build a prototype. Pitch the prototype. Grab a mate who can code, someone who can draw, one who can spell, etc, etc, as required, make a prototype (the language doesn't matter, flash makes great prototypes because it's quick to knock an idea into it). Take this prototype to a few studios (include ones that have taken third parties on-board before (so, uhh, Valve...)) and you might get a hit. If else, build the actual game from that point and go it the indy way.


NeoThermic
User avatar
Pox
level5
level5
Posts: 1786
Joined: Sat Mar 03, 2007 11:23 am
Location: Melbourne

Postby Pox » Fri Nov 28, 2008 9:53 am

Yes, don't take my post as discouraging from going into games - you just need to take a different approach. NeoThermic's tips are all good, as are his nested parentheses.
User avatar
LordSturm
level4
level4
Posts: 562
Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2006 5:13 am
Location: Australia - No Nukes :(
Contact:

Re: Question about submitting.

Postby LordSturm » Fri Nov 28, 2008 10:24 am

Spectre wrote:Hey, Im James and I have a thousand and one great ideas for games and I was wondering who I speak to about submitting them. Ive asked at a few other companies and alot have said that they dont take outside ideas, if they answer at all. So no worries if you have the same policy.

Ill check back with the board, look forward to hearin from ya.

-Spectre


My friend this is how the business infrastructure works, you take your idea, you invest money to attempt to apply it, you find others who are interested ( note if you fail at this point, you will probably fail altogether ) and you market your product. That way, you not only get what you wanted, you get money for making it a reality.

Problem! People think their ideas are the best! well of course they do, they liked it it enough in the first place to remember and develop it in their thoughts. The reality, is you could possibly be a minority that like your idea.

So businesses are hardly willing to "take peoples ideas" and apply them, without having LOTS OF MARKET RESEARCH.
Chances are if you can develop an idea that everyone likes, it's not original.

That's my opinion. ( Which is why you may not agree. :P )

EDIT: NeoThermic has a better (feasible) idea. :P
Spectre
level1
level1
Posts: 14
Joined: Sat Feb 18, 2006 5:57 pm

yup yup yup

Postby Spectre » Sat Nov 29, 2008 7:52 am

Well, Thanks everybody for the speedy reply, but this is something I know. See, I have several ideas in developement. basically a few friends and I are making prototype playthroughs with gamestudio software, but they arent finished yet. I do have one or two ideas that are ready for presentation with storyboards, script and concept art all ready to go.

Really Im just trying to find out is there some trick to arranging an appointment to talk to anybody in the gaming world?? everytime I call up it usually goes the same:

"Hi Im james and I have this great presentation for you to consider"

"Who are you with?"

"Well, I represent a small group of amatuer programmers, story-writers and computer artists."

"So......Capcom? Sony? help me out here..."

"Well, none of tho-"

*CLICK*

anytime someone does say anything about an appointment it's like the wizard of Oz. y'know, some lady told me to get a job with bioware work there for about a decade then work up the nerve to say something. It gets pretty frustrating at times but strangely not discouraging. I think the future for me is just getting a loan and publishing myself.

Well, thanks again for all the replies, if you guys know any way to get an appointment or who to ask for let me know. 'cause Im out of ideas on that end.

Later
User avatar
Wasgood
level5
level5
Posts: 1082
Joined: Sat Sep 02, 2006 11:44 am

Postby Wasgood » Sat Nov 29, 2008 11:16 pm

A lot of good game mods have been growing into independent studios this may be something you should look into.
Spectre
level1
level1
Posts: 14
Joined: Sat Feb 18, 2006 5:57 pm

lol

Postby Spectre » Sun Nov 30, 2008 2:06 am

Couldnt resist,


Thanx for tellin me wasgood! LOL....... ah.....ooo....sides...
User avatar
MaximusBrood
level4
level4
Posts: 615
Joined: Mon Jan 14, 2008 12:04 am

Postby MaximusBrood » Sun Nov 30, 2008 2:32 am

Actually, the only thing I have to say to this at this 'late' night is: "wut?".
Really, you've been getting exemplary advice by quite a few people, and you can only come up with this response?

Get a "...ooo..." 'something'.
Spectre
level1
level1
Posts: 14
Joined: Sat Feb 18, 2006 5:57 pm

uh.......huh....

Postby Spectre » Sun Nov 30, 2008 5:39 am

MaximusBrood wrote:Actually, the only thing I have to say to this at this 'late' night is: "wut?".
Really, you've been getting exemplary advice by quite a few people, and you can only come up with this response?

Get a "...ooo..." 'something'.





Alright I hereby apologise to any person I may have offended with my casual attitude. Your advice on this board has been wonderful if I havent conveyed that, then I again apologise. I am very greatful for the advice given thus far and enjoy that there is such an open medium of discussion.

However my question has yet to be answered. Im not impatient or anything, Im simply responding to prove that I check this once in a while and that I consider this an open discussion and not a monologue. Here it is in a different way: Now that I have the presentation in order, who is my audience? how do I see them?

I find it extremely hard to believe that all games everywhere are the result of internal deals with only a handful of independents. With this scenario its only a matter of time before five people on the planet choose what gets made. Although it would explain why the market is seemingly over-run with First person shooters and MMORPGs.

So, there you have it: Step one DONE. step two.........is what again?
Spectre
level1
level1
Posts: 14
Joined: Sat Feb 18, 2006 5:57 pm

one more thing.

Postby Spectre » Sun Nov 30, 2008 5:43 am

Dont mean to double post but here:

I just thought it was funny because wasgood told me whats good. Not a joke on them, more the tail end of a four day programming session. Again sorry wasgood, if I offended.
TomCat39
level3
level3
Posts: 303
Joined: Sat Oct 25, 2008 11:52 pm

Postby TomCat39 » Sun Nov 30, 2008 8:07 am

I was told by a friend who knows people on the inside of EA (We have a huge EA building here in BC) that they burn up people. So no, it's not the same 5 people putting out content.

Simply put, everyone at EA is constantly in fear of their jobs because the turn over is insane. They hire fresh people, use them up and toss them out on a regular basis. From what I understand, they hire fresh all the time to try and keep fresh ideas coming in. But also sounds like they don't retain too many people except maybe the top top. Executive leads or something of the like.

So maybe you might get a hearing with EA but by the sounds, I'd have patents first so they just don't turn you away and then publish your ideas. It doesn't sound like EA plays very nice.

Also, from your depiction, you need to make a name for yourselves. Like Introversion. They are 4 guys but they have their name. So when that gate keeper says, help me out here. Who are you with, Sony blah blah blah. You DON'T say None of those, or no or any negative. You simply respond with your name, "I'm with YOUR NAME HERE" "I represent a handful of young aspiring programmers, designers, and artists. And we have several presentations ready to go. I just need a time and a place to meet with your executives so that I can show them some fresh new ideas."

Avoid any negative or lessening comments. Avoid words like amateur, novice. Instead say young, aspiring, ambitious etc.

You got to remember, you are selling yourself, not your ideas. Once you get your appointment, then you are selling yourself AND your ideas.

Good luck. Getting past the gate keeper is the hardest step. Remember, they are paid to keep the riff raff out.
"Now, stop being a douche to the newbie, and run along."

xander
User avatar
KingAl
level5
level5
Posts: 4138
Joined: Sun Sep 10, 2006 7:42 am

Re: uh.......huh....

Postby KingAl » Sun Nov 30, 2008 11:08 am

Spectre wrote:I find it extremely hard to believe that all games everywhere are the result of internal deals with only a handful of independents. With this scenario its only a matter of time before five people on the planet choose what gets made. Although it would explain why the market is seemingly over-run with First person shooters and MMORPGs.

The reason it sounds implausible is because in your model the games industry can't develop without people sending in their great game ideas, which is itself implausible. In reality, people get hired, companies emerge, etc.: having ideas submitted to existing companies by random people is not the only way for new people and ideas to contribute. A lot of companies do have a central creative figure who leads design: consider Maxis, Lionhead, Firaxis, Doublefine. And, uh, Introversion.
In (wanky and suspiciously Randian) essence, "take, don't ask". Prove yourself, work up a portfolio, actually make something. Or, start out as an EA grunt and work upwards. Whatever you like.
Gentlemen, you can't fight in here: this is the War Room!

Ultimate Uplink Guide

Latest Patch

Return to “Introversion Lounge”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 17 guests