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Ace Rimmer
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Postby Ace Rimmer » Thu Dec 18, 2008 8:50 pm

:lol:

Ahem, I make sure to get my work done. :wink: In fact, I do more than most (in my dept), with less time. Otherwise, Thursday wouldn't happen the way it does. On a good note, I might be able to work from home next Tuesday if my dept get's it's work done before Monday's deadline, and we're currently on track.
Smoke me a kipper, I'll be back for breakfast...
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Postby TomCat39 » Thu Dec 18, 2008 9:35 pm

xander wrote:
TomCat39 wrote:
Xocrates wrote:Am I the only one who thinks working is way easier and more relaxed than (college level) studying? :?

Mind you, I don't work 10 hours a day (I usually work some 8 to 9, although admittedly I'm probably the one who works the least)


Nah, I'm with you, work is generally easier than college study. With work you know what youhave to do and you do it. With study you have to figure it all out aka learn. With work, they let you retry until you get it figured. With study, you just get pooor marks if you don't get it right the first time. With work, you leave it there once you punch that clock and go home (usually). With study, there is plenty more to study at home. Even long days at work are usually shorter than long days of study.

It really depends upon what you do for a living. For instance, I think that teaching is easier than school (I know the material, and only have to convey it to students). However, it is much more time consuming than studying -- 8 hours spent in the classroom every day, plus an hour or two every evening grading papers, plus more time on the weekend. Not to mention other work related activities, like "parent nights," home visits, and attending student performances.

xander

The full time student usually has the same issue. 8 hours of classes, then 4+ hours of homework, researching and/or studying. And many a weekend loss to cram sessions or essay writing.

It's true though, it really does make a difference by what you do for a living. Many executives work 70+ hours a week, let alone the time at home with the ol' blackberry.....
"Now, stop being a douche to the newbie, and run along."

xander
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Postby bert_the_turtle » Thu Dec 18, 2008 9:49 pm

/me is off to Portugal (Lisbon, to be precise) in about 12 hours. Don't destroy the internet without me!
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Postby jelco » Thu Dec 18, 2008 9:50 pm

bert_the_turtle wrote:/me is off to Portugal (Lisbon, to be precise) in about 12 hours. Don't destroy the internet without me!

I think Xocrates and/or Phelanpt live somewhere in that area. You should go visit!

Jelco
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Postby Ace Rimmer » Thu Dec 18, 2008 10:00 pm

jelco wrote:
bert_the_turtle wrote:/me is off to Portugal (Lisbon, to be precise) in about 12 hours. Don't destroy the internet without me!

I think Xocrates and/or Phelanpt live somewhere in that area. You should go visit!

Jelco

... and try not to break the internet whilst you visit them. :P
Smoke me a kipper, I'll be back for breakfast...
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Postby Lowell » Thu Dec 18, 2008 10:26 pm

Do not Teachers get time off like the kids? Getting off some of the summer months and holidays etc? Now I own my own company, but when I worked as an engineer for the past thirty years, I would work 60-80 hours a week, plus be on the road all the time, 24/7 on call too, only getting home one or two weekends a month. I had a huge crew, and if I didn't go over hospital or military base blue prints, the guys would be standing around the next morning...so there were many two am nights and little sleep. I remember one system cut-over that went on for days and nights...I worked 38 hours streight, then got six hours rest and went right back at it. Then there are the classes to get certified on every kind of telecommunications central office switch known to man and much more, some last a month or two. So my head has been buried in tech manuals for most of my life. Now that I am my own boss...I have gotten way lazy lol, and only work that hard and long for my art and game projects. :)

School and being young...savor those years; you will look back at school and friends for many decades, way after they are all far away and gone.
Happy Holidays :)
Last edited by Lowell on Thu Dec 18, 2008 10:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby jelco » Thu Dec 18, 2008 10:36 pm

Lowell wrote:Do not Teachers get time off like the kids? Getting off some of the summer months and holidays etc?

My father is a high school teacher, and experience tells that a large part of his 'free' time is put into preparing lessons. He used to do both social studies and economics. Even though he has since cut out social studies, which arguably takes most preparations, it still is obviously not an easy-going job, teaching full-time including graduating classes which comes with grading final exams in the heat of the school year finale, next to the already tons of big research assignments and of course exams to take a look at.

The best thing to do to get my father in a bad mood is confront him with the fact that my holiday has just begun at the onset of the summer holids when his is still two weeks away. There's probably more free time than the example you gave, but it's not as if it's almost as much free time as there is work to do. ;)

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Postby Lowell » Thu Dec 18, 2008 10:49 pm

Sounds like Teachers were just as busy after-hours. Social Sciences would be a hard job. The last seventy to eighty years on the planet have been pretty wacky as far as history goes, so many changes along the way to study. It would be great to hear all the thoughts about the Banker Robber Barons that exist in our present era from students. :P
Hats-off to all that teach, the planet just doesn’t have enough, we could never have too many.
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Postby TomCat39 » Thu Dec 18, 2008 11:20 pm

Then you can be a standard gvt stock worker and anything over 7 hours a day is overtime. Typical work week is 35 hours and weekends off. Much simplier than college studies. :P
"Now, stop being a douche to the newbie, and run along."



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Postby xander » Thu Dec 18, 2008 11:52 pm

TomCat39 wrote:The full time student usually has the same issue. 8 hours of classes, then 4+ hours of homework, researching and/or studying. And many a weekend loss to cram sessions or essay writing.

It's true though, it really does make a difference by what you do for a living. Many executives work 70+ hours a week, let alone the time at home with the ol' blackberry.....

I would really be interested to know where you attend such that you spend 8 hours a day in class (unless you are talking about some pre-university setting, in which case, you don't know what school work is like). At UNR, a full-time load is 12 credit hours. Many students might take 15 or 18 hours, but 12 hours is considered a full-time load. That means 15 hours per week in lecture. It is also assumed that you will spend another 30 hours or so outside of class each week completing assignments, researching, &c., bringing the student workload up to about 40 hours per week (what would be considered a full-time job in the US). Even the most diligent students are not working on school related stuff for more than 50 or 60 hours per week.

Compare that to how I described teaching. First, most high school teachers in this area will teach six classes in a day, each running 50 minutes (with five minutes between classes for transition). We are also contracted to be on campus at least 30 minutes before classes begin in the morning, and 30 minutes after classes end in the afternoon, and there is a 7th class hour that we have for prep time. This is basically an 8 hour day, not including 45 minutes for lunch (and most of that 45 minutes is often spent working, too). Right there, you have 40 hours per week. Add another 1.5 hours every weekday to grade (that is, plus about 8 hours), and 8-16 hours on the weekend to prepare, catch up on grading, &c., and you are looking at a 60 hour work week. This is as time consuming as attending classes.

Lowell: teachers do not get the same breaks as the students. We are generally required to stick around for a couple of weeks after the students leave, and to show up a couple of weeks early. In year round schools, where the breaks are only a month or so at a time, these periods are a bit shorter, but we still end up being at work when the students are not there. Furthermore, much of the break is spent working, as well. And it should be pointed out that the comparison I was making was to college students, who have basically the same academic calendar as a high school student -- thus, college students get as much time off as teachers (if not more).

When comparing this to other kinds of full-time jobs, teachers probably have fewer contracted hours, however, note that we don't get a lot of leave. We are generally granted five days of paid leave per year. We can take more time off than that, but we won't be paid for that. Compare that to most US companies, which grant at least two weeks of paid vacation every year, plus two weeks of sick leave. I think it basically comes out in the wash.

xander
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Postby Lowell » Fri Dec 19, 2008 12:11 am

...yup...so see guys, being a student in school isn't so bad after all huh? :)
Enjoy the Holidays
Last edited by Lowell on Fri Dec 19, 2008 12:11 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Xocrates » Fri Dec 19, 2008 12:11 am

xander wrote:I would really be interested to know where you attend such that you spend 8 hours a day in class


Actually, although that number does seem a bit high, I did manage to had close to that in college.

By default I had 6 different courses by semester, each with 4-6 hours of classes per week making for about 30 hours weekly. Add to the fact that due to a poor first year I usually had +2 coursesto catch up with (and I was a slightly above average student) and I had semesters with pretty much that workload.

Mind you, 4 additional hours of homework per day does seem a bit much. But we usually did had to deliver lab reports (often 2) every week or two, plus ongoing group works that usually required (at least) a presentation and an extensive report.

And then, of course, comes exam season...

Thing is, I'm pretty sure that by my college standards we weren't all that bad.

I'm pretty sure that if I walked past my college next week, the computer labs would be full.
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Postby MikeTheWookiee » Fri Dec 19, 2008 12:56 am

I've looked at my timetable for after the break, and once the exams are out of the way, I've a whopping 12 hours a week, spread over 2 whole days. That number includes lectures and scheduled workshop / lab sessions. There is a project, but I haven't done anything on it so far, and have no real plans to start until March... As for independent / outside lecture study, others do it, but I mostly sit with them, drink tea, do sudoku, and give them a hand with theirs if they need it. :)

Total - 15-20 hours at a push. This is a great big piece of piss. What I remember from work, on the other hand, was having to be out of bed and in work, reasonably presentable, <not still pissed from last night>, at the allotted time (fortunately 10am). Then actually functioning and talking to people reasonably for the next 9 hours (included lunch break) and being able to think through various tasks (like not blowing the factory up).
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Postby Colmy » Fri Dec 19, 2008 12:57 am

a change of subject, guess the song:

-./.-.
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Postby Mas Tnega » Fri Dec 19, 2008 1:03 am

Less than three, you and me, typing out my fantasy. Meet me here on IRC, L-O-L-O-L.

[size=0]"NR"? The hell? Swapping dots and dashes makes only slightly more sense...[/size]

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